Reconstitution, Storage,
and Handling

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Recommended Reconstitution1

  • Draw up the appropriate amount of preservative-free 0.9% Sodium Chloride Injection USP and insert the needle into the Dysport vial
  • The partial vacuum will begin to pull the diluent into the vial
    • Do not use the vial if no vacuum is observed
  • Any remaining required diluent should be expressed into the vial manually
  • Swirl gently to dissolve
  • Reconstituted solution should be clear, colorless, and free of particulate matter

Administration1

  • Administer within 4 hours of reconstitution. During this period:
    • Store under refrigeration at 2° to 8°C (36° to 46°F)
    • Protect from light
    • Do not freeze

Storage and handling1

  • Store under refrigeration at 2° to 8°C (36° to 46°F)
  • Protect from light
  • Do not use after the expiration date on the vial
  • All vials, including expired vials or equipment used with Dysport, should be disposed of carefully, as is done with all medical waste

Indication

Dysport is an acetylcholine release inhibitor and a neuromuscular blocking agent indicated for the treatment of adults with cervical dystonia to reduce the severity of abnormal head position and neck pain in both toxin-naïve and previously treated patients.

Important Safety Information

Distant Spread of Toxin Effect: Postmarketing reports indicate that the effects of Dysport and all botulinum toxin products may spread from the area of injection to produce symptoms consistent with botulinum toxin effects. These may include asthenia, generalized muscle weakness, diplopia, blurred vision, ptosis, dysphagia, dysphonia, dysarthria, urinary incontinence, and breathing difficulties. These symptoms have been reported hours to weeks after injection. Swallowing and breathing difficulties can be life threatening, and there have been reports of death. The risk of symptoms is probably greatest in children treated for spasticity, but symptoms can also occur in adults treated for spasticity and other conditions, particularly in those patients who have underlying conditions that would predispose them to these symptoms. In unapproved uses, including spasticity in children and adults, and in approved indications, cases of spread of effect have been reported at doses comparable to those used to treat cervical dystonia and at lower doses.

Dysport is contraindicated in patients with hypersensitivity to any botulinum toxin product or its excipients, including human albumin, lactose, and cow's milk protein, or who have an infection at the proposed injection site.

The potency Units of Dysport are not interchangeable with other preparations of botulinum toxin products and, therefore, Units of biological activity of Dysport cannot be compared to or converted into Units of any other botulinum toxin products. Recommended dose and frequency of administration should not be exceeded.

Immediate medical attention may be required in cases of respiratory, speech, or swallowing difficulties. Dysphagia may persist for several weeks, and require use of a feeding tube to maintain adequate nutrition and hydration. Aspiration may result from severe dysphagia and is a particular risk when treating patients in whom swallowing or respiratory function is already compromised. Concomitant neuromuscular disorder may exacerbate clinical effects of treatment.

Individuals with peripheral motor neuropathic diseases, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or neuromuscular junction disorders should be monitored particularly closely when given botulinum toxin. Patients with neuromuscular disorders may be at increased risk of clinically significant effects, including severe dysphagia and respiratory compromise from typical doses of Dysport.

Dysport contains human albumin. Based on effective donor screening and product manufacturing processes, Dysport carries an extremely remote risk for transmission of viral diseases. A theoretical risk for transmission of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) also is considered extremely remote. No cases of transmission of viral diseases or CJD have ever been identified for albumin.

The possibility of an immune reaction when injected intradermally is unknown. The safety of Dysport for the treatment of hyperhidrosis has not been established.

Patients receiving concomitant treatment of Dysport and aminoglycosides or other agents interfering with neuromuscular transmission (e.g., curare-like agents), or muscle relaxants, should be observed closely because the effect of botulinum toxin may be potentiated. Use of anticholinergic drugs may potentiate systemic anticholinergic effects. The effect of administering different botulinum neurotoxins during the course of treatment with Dysport is unknown.

There are no adequate and well-controlled studies in pregnant women. Dysport should be used during pregnancy only if the potential benefit justifies the potential risk to the fetus.

The most commonly observed adverse reactions (>5% of patients) with Dysport for the treatment of cervical dystonia are muscular weakness, dysphagia, dry mouth, injection site discomfort, fatigue, headache, neck pain, musculoskeletal pain, dysphonia, injection site pain, and eye disorders.

To report SUSPECTED ADVERSE REACTIONS or product complaints, contact Ipsen at 1-877-397-7671 (877- DYSPOR1). You may also report SUSPECTED ADVERSE REACTIONS to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or www.fda.gov/medwatch.

Please see full Prescribing Information, including Boxed Warning, and Medication Guide.

All trademarks used herein belong to their respective owners.

Reference:

1. Dysport Prescribing Information. Ipsen Biopharmaceuticals, Inc. March 2012.